Cast Iron Cookware: Myths, Tips, and a Recipe

Cast Iron Cookware Cast iron skillets are a great addition to any kitchen since they are durable, versatile, and hold heat. They come in several sizes, and if cared for properly, they should last for generations. If you would like...

Cast Iron Skillets
Cast Iron Cookware

Cast iron skillets are a great addition to any kitchen since they are durable, versatile, and hold heat. They come in several sizes, and if cared for properly, they should last for generations. If you would like to learn about myths, truths, tips, and a delicious recipe, continue reading.

Myths and Truths

Myth: Cast iron is hard to maintain because it can easily chip, crack or rust.

Truth: Cast iron is very tough. That's why it commonly lasts for decades.

Myth: Cast iron evenly heats.

Truth: Cast iron is not the best when it comes to evenly heating. When you place an iron skillet on a burner, hot spots will form on top of where the flames are, and the rest of the pan will remain moderately cool. If you want to evenly heat your skillet, set it on a burner and allow it to preheat for at least ten minutes, rotating occasionally. You can also heat it in the oven for twenty to thirty minutes.

Myth: Never wash cast iron with soap.

Truth: Washing cast iron with soap will not damage the skillet’s seasoning which is a thin layer of polymerized oil. When a cast iron pan is properly seasoned, the oil has already broken down into a plastic-like material that has bonded to the metal’s surface. This is how cast iron that is well-seasoned gets its non-stick properties.

Myth: Never use metal utensils on a cast iron pan.

Truth: The seasoning used for cast iron cookware is pretty resilient, so you can use metal utensils without problems. If you do see black flakes in your food during the cooking process, it is likely carbonized food bits that were stuck to the skillet's surface due to the lack of proper cleaning after the last use.

Tips

In order to keep your cast iron skillet in good condition, you need to:

Season before the first use. Even if it’s pre-seasoned, it is a good idea to add more. To do this, heat your skillet on the stove until hot, rub it with a little oil, and let it cool. Repeat the process a few times.

Wash after cooking or baking. Scrub off any grime by using soap, warm water, and a sponge. To prevent rusting, be sure to completely dry the skillet. If rusting does occur, give it a good scrubbing and re-season.

Use it. The best way to maintain the skillet's seasoning is to cook or bake with it regularly. It is great for frying potatoes and searing steaks.

Skillet Recipe - Chocolate Chip-Cherry Cookies

Chocolate Chip Cherry Cookie
Chocolate Chip Cherry Cookie

This recipe calls for three eight inch cast iron skillets.

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups all purpose-flour
  • 1/2 cup quick-cooking rolled oats
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 ½ sticks of room temperature unsalted butter
  • 1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 egg
  • 2/3 cup dark chocolate chips
  • 1/3 cup dried tart cherries

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit or 191 degrees Celsius.
  2. In a large bowl, combine flour, baking soda, oats, and salt, then set aside.
  3. Using a stand mixer with a paddle attachment, cream the butter and brown sugar until light and fluffy. Add the vanilla and mix on medium-low speed. Add the egg and stir to combine.
  4. Add the dry ingredients and mix on medium-low speed until combined.
  5. Lastly, by hand, stir in the cherries and chocolate chips. Refrigerate for thirty minutes.
  6. Scoop the dough into balls using a one-inch cookie scoop. Drop one ball into each miniature cast iron skillet. Bake 13 to 15 minutes or until soft in the center and golden brown around the edges.

If you have any questions about cast iron cookware, please contact us for more information.